Posts in Military
María Jesús Alvarado Rivera, La Primera Feminista Iberoamericana | Episode 78

María Jesús Alvarado Rivera was a Peruvian journalist and feminist at the turn of the 20th century. She was inspired by her own childhood teacher and went on to speak about the importance of full equality for women in Peru. The most incredible thing about Maria was her dedication to achieving full equality for women - not only the vote, which was the primary feminist topic of the time. Later on, she got her message across through her work in the arts and the theater and though she lived long enough to see women achieve the right to vote in Peru, the victory was bittersweet because women's equality is still out of reach today. Maria was a seriously good witch, and we're honored to feature her during Hispanic/Latinx Heritage Month.

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Carmen Contreras-Bozak, First Puerto Rican Woman to Go Overseas in WWII | Episode 77

Carmen Contreras-Bozak was the first Puerto Rican woman to go overseas as a codebreaker for the army in WW2. She joined at a time when women's contributions to the war were not seen as military, and they were therefore not entitled to the same benefits as male soldiers, such as access to VA hospitals or overseas payment. Carmen was a patriot in the truest sense - a young American woman born in the territory of Puerto Rico who found a life she loved in the mainland, and volunteered without hesitation to defend it.

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The ENIAC Six: The Inventors of Computer Programming | Episode 70

During World War 2, scientists developed a machine called THE ENIAC that they thought might be able to take the burden of computing intricate ballistics computations off of the human "computers", usually women, hired for the task. The problem was, they needed someone to program the machine, and that had never been done before. Enter the ENIAC programmers - six women computers hired to take on the task of programming the very first machine computer. Little did they know the impact this job would have on society, and the pure fact that a group of six women quite literally invented computer programming was lost to history - until now. Their names are: Kathleen McNulty Mauchly Antonelli, Jean Jennings Bartik, Frances Snyder Holberton, Marlyn Wescoff Meltzer, Frances Bilas Spence, and Ruth Lichterman Teitelbaum.

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The Transgender Spy of 18th Century France, Chevaliere d'Eon | Episode 64

The Chevaliere D'Eon was a woman in 18th century France (historically known as Chevalier d'Eon) who, born as a man, was a soldier, a lawyer, and a spy for King Louis XV for many years before publicly declaring herself a woman, which was accepted as truth by the public. She acquired feminist works and did swordplay demonstrations in her heavy dresses. She lived as a woman for thirty three years in post-revolutionary France.

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Asian-American Women Take Flight: Katherine Cheung and Hazel Ying Lee | Episode 60

Anna May Wong is considered Hollywood's first Asian American movie star. Despite being forced to portray racist roles in the films Hollywood was peddling at the time, Anna was persistent about pursuing roles that could satiate her desire to play three dimensional Asian characters on the screen, traveling across Europe and China in an effort to find herself and roles she might actually enjoy playing. Anna May Wong was and is an inspiration to some of the best actresses and filmmakers working today, including Lucy Liu, who received her own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame next to Anna May Wong's on May 1, 2019, making her the second Asian actor on the Walk.

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The Red Spy Queen | Episode 25

Elizabeth Bentley was a communist spy turned American spy and informant in the 1930’s – 40’s – she spent enough time as a communist spy that when she defected from the party, Russian spying in the US effectively ceased for years, so vast was her damaging knowledge. While she was neither a good witch nor a bad bitch, spending much more time in the gray area, it can’t be disputed that without Elizabeth Bentley, we wouldn’t have background checks, an oath of allegiance for government officials when they are sworn in, and McCarthyism might not have been the movement that it came to be.

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