Brenda Berkman Fought Discrimination So She Could Fight Fires and Save Lives | Episode 76

Brenda Berkman has been fighting tirelessly for women's rights her entire life. Starting in the late 70's - early 80's, when she won a lawsuit in New York that resulted in the admission of women into the New York fire department for the first time in history, to her courageous contribution as a first responder during 911, to her advocacy work for women firefighters and first responders across the country in the years after 9/11. Brenda Berkman is tireless, fearless, and still going strong.

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The "Lioness of Brittany", Jeanne De Clisson, Brought Vengeance in Three Black Ships with Red Sails | Episode 75

”Jeanne de Clisson was a 14th century Bretton noblewoman who is today mostly remembered for her 13-year long career as a pirate and privateer in the waters of English Channel. Born in the high nobility of the northern French province, she swore revenge against the France for the execution of her husband that was approved by the King Philip VI himself. During the time of her naval war, she gained the nickname "Lioness of Brittany", which is remembered vividly in the modern history and pop culture.” 

She was one bad bitch roaming the open seas until she returned to her good witch ways. 

(from: http://www.annebonnypirate.com/famous-female-pirates/jeanne-de-clisson/)

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Sana Amanat, The Modern Marvel Who is Reshaping Representation in Comics | Episode 73

Sana Amanat joined Marvel Comics in 2009 after working for two years at Virgin Comics, a short-lived indie publisher that folded in 2008, after having only just launched in 2006. Marvel saw something special in her, and for good reason - as the VP of Content and Character Development at Marvel, she launched Ms Marvel, one of their most popular series, and is systematically helping to update Marvel characters from misogynistic dreams to feminist heroes and icons. And she is nowhere near done.

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Margaret Cavendish, Philosopher, Writer, Creator of Science Fiction | Episode 71

Margaret Cavendish was known during her time as a duchess during the Reformation and Restoration as a shy, kooky philosopher with her head in the clouds. But the truth is, Margaret Cavendish is responsible for science fiction as we know it today, thanks to her philosophical novella about a woman who is whisked off to another dimension, where humans and animals co-exist in harmony under the rule of a benevolent empress, and airships cloud the sky. Margaret was deeply curious and devoted her life to writing, philosophy, and science, long before society stopped frowning on such activities. She was a seriously good witch who marched to the beat of her own damn drum!

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Nellie Bly Literally Went Crazy To Expose An Asylum | Episode 72

Nellie Bly is an incredible historical figure and certainly ahead of her time. She was a keen and tireless reporter, and she knew her worth. She became famous for her stunt as an undercover reporter in a famous mental asylum on New York's Roosevelt Island, exposing the horrendous conditions there and garnering the hospital millions in funding from an abashed government. It wasn't the only thing she was famous for - Nellie also became the first woman to travel around the world in 80 (or, in her case, 72) days - stopping to meet Jules Verne at his home in France along the way.

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The ENIAC Six: The Inventors of Computer Programming | Episode 70

During World War 2, scientists developed a machine called THE ENIAC that they thought might be able to take the burden of computing intricate ballistics computations off of the human "computers", usually women, hired for the task. The problem was, they needed someone to program the machine, and that had never been done before. Enter the ENIAC programmers - six women computers hired to take on the task of programming the very first machine computer. Little did they know the impact this job would have on society, and the pure fact that a group of six women quite literally invented computer programming was lost to history - until now. Their names are: Kathleen McNulty Mauchly Antonelli, Jean Jennings Bartik, Frances Snyder Holberton, Marlyn Wescoff Meltzer, Frances Bilas Spence, and Ruth Lichterman Teitelbaum.

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Dr. Linda Hazzard, the Seattle Fasting Specialist | Episode 69

If you had an ailment in the early 1900's. Linda Hazzard had a solution for you. That solution was fasting, a process she helped you complete in her private Washington Sanatorium, where she would oversee your meals (or lack thereof), your "treatments" (which included enemas and extreme body massages), and, in some cases, your wealth. She claimed her method of fasting could detox the body, cure disease, and make a person feel good as new...unless it killed you.

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The Countess di Castiglione, the Selfie Queen of Paris | Episode 68

The Countess di Castiglione, sometimes referred to as the original Selfie Queen, was a socialite in Paris who established herself there by having an affair with Napoleon. From then on, she had many affairs with society men, but she was most known by everyone in Paris society as the woman who meticulously (and some would say narcissistically) art-directed hundreds of photos of herself - in the mid-1800's.

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The Woman Who Designed the Hearst Castle, Julia Morgan | Episode 67

Julia Morgan's architectural genius was overlooked by history for almost a hundred years before she posthumously earned the American Institute of Artists Gold Medal, the first woman ever to do so. Besides the design largely considered to be her masterpiece, the Hearst Castle in San Simeon, Julia was responsible for designing myriad buildings, mostly in California, that stand the test of time today.

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Tracey "Africa" Norman - Model, Performer, and Transgender Icon | Episode 66

Tracey "Africa" Norman is a trans woman whose modeling career was on a roll in the 70's and 80's, with Vogue and Essence covers and even her face on one of Clairol's most popular box colors of its time - until someone learned her secret, and outed her to the rest of the modeling world. Years went by and other activists, models, and actors like Janet Mock and Laverne Cox learned of Tracey as their own careers began to rise, and took huge inspiration from her. Now her modeling career is blossoming once again thanks to changing national attitudes about gender, beauty, and identity. We have a long way to go, but people like Tracey are helping to create systemic change just by unabashedly being who they are.

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The Transgender Spy of 18th Century France, Chevaliere d'Eon | Episode 64

The Chevaliere D'Eon was a woman in 18th century France (historically known as Chevalier d'Eon) who, born as a man, was a soldier, a lawyer, and a spy for King Louis XV for many years before publicly declaring herself a woman, which was accepted as truth by the public. She acquired feminist works and did swordplay demonstrations in her heavy dresses. She lived as a woman for thirty three years in post-revolutionary France.

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Marion Stokes: Keeper of VHS Chronicles for Over 30 Years | Episode 62

In the coming years, you will be able to search the Internet Archive and find footage from news cycles between 1975 and 2012. Because TV stations at the time usually erased their footage so they could record new segments on old tapes, the only reason you will soon be able to see these programs is because one woman, Marion Stokes, took it upon herself to record the 24 hour news cycle all on her own. 

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Queen Liliʻuokalani: The First Queen and Last Regent of Hawai'i | Episode 61

Queen Lili was the first queen to rule Hawai’i alone - she also happened to be Hawai’i's last monarch before the US stole the country from the Native Hawaiians in a violent and illegal coup, and annexed it as a territory and later state of the US. She was a songwriter and a pacifist and though she did not have much time on the throne, she was and continues to be beloved by her people.

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Asian-American Women Take Flight: Katherine Cheung and Hazel Ying Lee | Episode 60

Anna May Wong is considered Hollywood's first Asian American movie star. Despite being forced to portray racist roles in the films Hollywood was peddling at the time, Anna was persistent about pursuing roles that could satiate her desire to play three dimensional Asian characters on the screen, traveling across Europe and China in an effort to find herself and roles she might actually enjoy playing. Anna May Wong was and is an inspiration to some of the best actresses and filmmakers working today, including Lucy Liu, who received her own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame next to Anna May Wong's on May 1, 2019, making her the second Asian actor on the Walk.

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The First Chinese-American Hollywood Movie Star, Anna May Wong | Episode 59

Anna May Wong is considered Hollywood's first Asian American movie star. Despite being forced to portray racist roles in the films Hollywood was peddling at the time, Anna was persistent about pursuing roles that could satiate her desire to play three dimensional Asian characters on the screen, traveling across Europe and China in an effort to find herself and roles she might actually enjoy playing. Anna May Wong was and is an inspiration to some of the best actresses and filmmakers working today, including Lucy Liu, who received her own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame next to Anna May Wong's on May 1, 2019, making her the second Asian actor on the Walk.

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The First Asian-American Member Of Congress, Patsy Mink | Episode 58

Patsy Mink is known for being the first Asian American woman elected to Congress, but her amazingness stretches far beyond that. Thanks to sexism and prejudice, Patsy was barred from attending medical school despite a stellar academic record. Her dream of becoming a doctor dashed by circumstances beyond her control, Patsy turned her attention to making sure all women had equal opportunities in education, becoming a lawyer and then a congresswoman who authored the revolutionary Title IX legislation that changed education in this country forever. Her accomplishments were numerous and her drive unmatched. Patsy Mink was one seriously bad bitch.

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Marjory Stoneman Douglas Protected The River Of Grass | Episode 57

Marjory Stoneman Douglas was a writer, activist, and accidental conservationist. She was already heading toward middle age, having worked as a journalist and for the Navy and the Red Cross, by the time she discovered the Florida Everglades. Once it became clear to her that Florida was on the verge of destroying the unique and incredible ecosystem that only existed in the Sunshine State, she spent the rest of her long life writing about and working toward utter preservation of the Florida Everglades. She lived to see the Everglades become completely protected thanks in large part to her work, and advocated for them until her death at 108. Good witch? We think so!

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